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End Passing the Trash


"In passing SB46, we will no longer pass the trash here in P.A., but we will make sure that the trash is where it should be and that is in a can with the lid closed tightly."

(Pennsylvania State Representative, Cherelle L. Parker, April 30, 2013 Press Conference on The S.E.S.A.M.E. Act)

These cases and the Oregon and Missouri laws have paved the way to prohibit and punish those who engage in passing the trash.

Please take a moment to explore these cases and help us in ending the habit of passing the trash!

Precedent Cases:

John Doe vs Porter Gaud: A sad commentary about Charleston S.C. area schools

Plaintiff's attorney brief: Click here to view

Defendant's attorney brief:Passing the Trash John Doe vs Porter Gaud

Randi W. vs Muroc Joint Unified School District, et.al.

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF CALIFORNIA

In this case, we must decide under what circumstances courts may impose tort liability on employers who fail to use reasonable care in recommending former employees for employment without disclosing material information bearing on their fitness.

A ruling by the Illinois Supreme Court today says the Unit Five school district, which fired a teacher over allegations of sexual misconduct, had a duty to warn another district where the teacher later found work.

JANE DOE-3 et al., Appellees, v. McLEAN COUNTY UNITDISTRICT

No. 5 BOARD OF DIRECTORS et al., Appellants.

Oregon law paves the way to end Passing the Trash.

Law will protect students from sexual misconduct by school staff | OregonLive.com

When the capstone on a series of laws intended to eliminate sexual misconduct by school employees takes effect Thursday, hiring and training practices for K-12 staff will change.

The new law defines sexual conduct – a previously hazy term – as being sexual in nature, aimed at a student and creating an "intimidating, hostile or offensive environment," that interferes with a student's performance. The law creates stringent policies for reporting and punishing sexual conduct.

Amy Hestir Student Protection Act

In 2011, Missouri pioneered legislation to address the problem of educator sexual abuse offenders moving to new school districts, passing the Amy Hestir Student Protection Act. The Act requires school districts formerly employing an educator against whom substantiated allegations of sexual misconduct were filed to inform other school districts of the misconduct if providing a reference for that educator. Read more about the Act here.


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