Calling Upon The Senate To Act
42:04
Sands of Silence Official Trailer English 2:30 min
02:35

Sands of Silence Official Trailer English 2:30 min

SANDS OF SILENCE: Waves of Courage - The Film that Gives Courage to Speak Out against Sexual Violence facebook.com/sandsofsilence twitter.com/sandsofsilence www.sandsofsilence.org **Winner Feature Documentary** 59th Southern California Journalism Awards 2017 **Nominee Best Documentary** 32nd Imagen Awards 2017 **Second place** 2017 Fada Cultural Award- Barcelona - Fundació Vicki Bernadet **Best Documentary Film** 2016 Malibu International Film Festival **Best Film Audience Award** 2016 Malibu International Film Festival **Best Documentary Audience Award** 2016 Awareness Film Festival, Los Angeles **First Prize and Silver Biznaga - Asserting Women’s Rights** 2016 Malaga Film Festival, Spain LOG LINE: Inspired by the transformation of the sex-trafficking survivors whose lives she follows, the filmmaker finds the courage to break the silence about sexual abuse in her own life. SYNOPSIS: A 15-year quest to expose the underworld of sexual exploitation and trafficking from Asia to the Americas leads world-reporter Chelo Alvarez-Stehle to the windswept beach where her childhood ended and family secrets began. As she documents the transformation of sex-trafficking survivor Virginia Isaias—a Mexican American woman whose past is engulfed in a cycle of sexual exploitation—into a resilient survivor committed to break that pattern, Chelo undertakes a parallel journey of healing and introspection as she sets out to shatter the silence about abuse in her own life. sandsofsilence.org
Raped by a Teacher in My School | Male Sexual Assault
07:11

Raped by a Teacher in My School | Male Sexual Assault

"It started to become aggressive and violent. I didn't know what was happening. I kept thinking to myself...this guy's gonna kill me." To help raise awareness around the sexual abuse and assault of boys and men, please like, subscribe, & share. Find information and support regarding male sexual abuse and assault: https://1in6.org/ Chat with an advocate through the national helpline for male survivors: https://1in6.org/helpline OR 1-877-628-1in6 Join a weekly online support group for male survivors: https://1in6.org/supportgroups View other male survivor stories: https://1in6.org/bristlecone Request a training around male sexual trauma for service providers: https://1in6.org/training Give to help sustain and grow services for men who have experienced sexual abuse or assault: https://1in6.org/give Like us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/1in6org Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/1in6org Find us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/1in6org ------------------------- Manassah begins with this: “I am not a superhero. I cannot fly. I cannot spin spider webs from my wrists. But I do have a super power. A super power that we all possess: the ability to overcome extreme adversity and challenges.” His story, he says, is not unique and the specifics of what happened are irrelevant. What is relevant, he insists, is how he responded. At the age of 13, he survived a brutal rape, and a life that was once filled with light and promise was now consumed by darkness, fear and shame. He could not comprehend what had happened. He felt shattered. By his mid-20’s, the darkness, fear and shame were too much to bear. He had to make a choice: life or death. He chose life. He walked into an emergency room and asked for help. He surrounded himself with people and professionals who understood the challenges that he would face and he got to work. He worked very hard for many years to break free from the darkness, fear and shame, and break free he did, and he wants other survivors to know that they can too. “I am not a superhero, I am just an ordinary guy but I have achieved the unimaginable. My life is once again filled with light and promise. The darkness, fear and shame are in my past. I am happy.“ ------------------------- 1in6 is a national nonprofit organization supporting the estimated 1 in 6 men who have experienced sexual abuse or assault. At 1in6, we believe that the tens of millions of male survivors who have had such experiences deserve to live whole, meaningful lives, but we know that isn’t always easy. Entrenched myths about masculinity, the stigma and silence around the issue, and a lack of male-specific services are just some of the barriers men face to seeking help and addressing emotional wounds in a healthy way. Men who feel unsafe to disclose and seek help may risk exposure to social dysfunction and mental and physical health issues, including but not limited to: depression, PTSD, suicidal ideation, addiction, isolation, fear of intimacy, confusion about sexuality, interpersonal violence, and feelings such as anger, guilt, shame, and distrust. We help men overcome the negative effects of past experiences and reclaim their lives by offering information, outreach, and free and anonymous services for men and their loved ones, as well as service providers working with men. #1in6 This video is part of 1in6's YouTube channel, created by Good Pictures: https://goodpictures.co Good Pictures is a video production company helping nonprofits, foundations, government agencies, and businesses create positive change. Email hello@goodpictures.co if you need help building a successful YouTube channel, or if you have any other video production needs.
A Call to Action: Stopping Sexual Abuse by School Employees | Charol Shakeshaft | TEDxYouth@RVA
13:58

A Call to Action: Stopping Sexual Abuse by School Employees | Charol Shakeshaft | TEDxYouth@RVA

In the past year, 5.7 million students have faced sexual abuse from school employees across all 50 states in America. But how and why does this problem persist? Educational researcher Charol Shakeshaft explores the atrocities of school employee sexual misconduct through powerful stories and offers potential solutions to this unsettling situation. Charol Shakeshaft has been studying equity and justice in schools for four decades. Charol is an acclaimed author, receiving national and state awards. She was just awarded a grant from the Centers for Disease Control to study the prevention of school employee sexual misconduct. In 2004, Dr. Shakeshaft completed a report mandated by the U.S. Senate that presented on the prevalence of educator sexual misconduct as well as recommendations to the Senate and House of Representatives for federal, state, and local prevention initiatives. Dr. Shakeshaft serves as an expert witness in both criminal and civil cases on the sexual abuse of children in youth organizations and schools. She was elected an AERA fellow in 2015 and received the 2015 AERA Distinguished Contributions to Gender Equity in Education Research Award and the 2020 Outstanding Research Award. Charol currently teaches graduate courses in the Department of Educational Leadership at Virginia Commonwealth University. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
In Loving Memory
05:41

In Loving Memory

In Loving Memory of Roy Edward Bell & his son Jeremy Bell. Fitzpatrick's 'Jeremy Bell Act' Language Enhances Student Safety in Education Bill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_lnqFQ_ynY&feature=share 2012-04-16 Jeremy Bell Act Hearing with Mike Fitzpatrick https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5ztIvDytB0 *Picture courtesy of Roy Bell PHILLY.COM http://articles.philly.com/2013-10-31/news/43530281_1_roy-bell-school-safety-sesame H.R. 2083 Protecting Students from Sexual and Violent Predators Act Sen. Williams Comments on Death of Roy Edward Bell HARRISBURG, Oct. 21, 2013 — State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams issued the following statement today about the significance of the death of the Fayette County, W. Va., father whose son became the tragic victim of teacher sexual abuse: "I was deeply saddened by news of the passing of Roy Edward Bell. His son, Jeremy, has been a constant reminder as to why the work we're engaged in now is important. Jeremy fell victim to a school-based predator -- one who groomed, abused, and ultimately murdered him. It was a visceral example of why a proactive measure to curb this behavior is so urgently needed. "Roy spent his remaining days seeking justice; not just for his son, but for all children and families so brutalized and victimized. He supported Senate Bill 46, the "Stop Educator Sexual Abuse, Misconduct and Exploitation Act," and even drove from his home in West Virginia to stand by my side last spring to express what a bill like this could have meant for him and his family, had it been law in 1997. "In his memory, in the memory of his son, and for all the unnamed survivors of such crimes, it is my hope that we can finally end the practice of 'passing the trash' in Pennsylvania, and across this nation."
WNCN Investigates | Teacher Sexual Misconduct
04:38

WNCN Investigates | Teacher Sexual Misconduct

Subscribe to our main channel! http://wncn.tv/1lkG6er Check out our latest content! http://www.wncn.com Like us on Facebook! http://www.wncn.com/facebook Follow us on Twitter! http://www.wncn.com/twitter Follow us on Instagram! http://www.instagram.com/wncntv The moment the school bell rings, students step into their classroom for one reason: to get an education. On the front lines are teachers. “99 percent-plus of our teachers behave in a very ethical manner,” explained State Superintendent June Atkinson. Teachers are entrusted with children, but sometimes that trust is taken advantage of. “It is of epidemic proportions,” said Terri Miller, president of S.E.S.A.M.E. or Stop Educator Sexual Misconduct. “It's one of the worst forms of child abuse that has gone unrecognized for decades.” A study conducted by the United States Department of Education found that “sexual misconduct by educators occurs in the school, in classrooms, in hallways, in offices, on buses, in cars, in the educator's home, and in outdoor secluded areas.” The report also cites an analysis done by the American Association of University Women which concluded that nearly 10 percent of all students are targets of educator sexual misconduct some time during their school career. “One in 10 children is being affected by educator sexual misconduct between kindergarten and twelfth grade. That amounts to approximately five million children in the United States today,” Miller said. S.E.S.A.M.E. provides materials for teachers on how to look for signs of sexual misconduct. In North Carolina, teacher-student sexual relationships are against the law regardless of age. WNCN Investigates started compiling and digging through court records and found that in the past five years, teachers have been charged more than 700 times for sexual misconduct with students. “This is child sexual abuse and child rape and we have to recognize it as that,” Miller said. “It's wretched. It wreaks havoc on their lives, their relationships, their emotional well-being.” Miller said most cases often go unreported. In 2002, Timothy Weaver, a band teacher at East Forsyth High School, was charged with sexual misconduct with a student. WNCN Investigates spoke to the father of the victim, who didn't want to go on camera. He said the teacher had inappropriate relations with his 16-year-old daughter and reported it to county law enforcement. The student and her family sued the school district saying it was negligent and ignored complaints. “If you are in a situation where you believe that an inappropriate relationship is taking place between a teacher and student, please report the issue to the proper law enforcement and school officials and share your concerns and information with them. If you feel that children are still at risk and no action is taking place, please contact the attorney for the state Department of Instruction and they will terminate the educator's certification if enough evidence is shown so that the teacher does not resign and move to another school and teach, as happened in my case,” the father explained. “Mr. Harry Wilson, the former attorney for N.C. DPI, terminated the teacher's credentials. Usually school administrators take this action, but parents and concerned citizens can present information as well.” The number of teachers losing their teaching license sheds new light on the problem. According to records from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, that number has doubled over the past 10 years to more than 800 teachers. More than 50 percent were because of inappropriate relationships with students. WNCN Investigates took the issue to State Superintendent June Atkinson. “School districts are becoming more and more diligent in reporting those offenses to the Department of Public Instruction,” Atkinson explained. But the classroom isn't limited to four walls, and social media is blurring the lines between student-teacher boundaries. High school students told WNCN that a teacher interacting with students isn't uncommon. “Some students think that their teachers should be in really close relationships when in reality, it's just school and that's it,” said one student. Teens will also tell you that social media is where most of them live, spending hours a day on apps like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and others. “Monitoring their usage is the main thing parents can and should be doing,” Miller said.